Racism-towards-Asian-community-white-paper_3-980×653

Undoubtedly, you have heard someone say that  all  Asians  look the same or are  the  same.  While this is far from the  truth,  it continues to be shared  as  if  it  is. Not every Asian person is from the same culture. Even  the  ones  that are do not have the same lives and experiences. There are 48 countries in the continent of  Asia.  Forty- Eight. So no, not every Asian person you see is Chinese or Japanese.

Asian people can also identify with their region, country, or continent. For instance, someone who is Chinese can also identify as East Asian, and/or Asian. Every Chinese person is East Asian and Asian, but not every East Asian or every Asian is Chinese.

WHITE PASSING

White passing means that a person who is not white culturally  has  a skin tone fair  enough  or  has features that could allow them “pass” for a white person.  East Asians tend to be the closest to having white-passing traits. Why does this matter? This can affect those who cannot pass for white because they are more likely to experience racism. On the  other side, Asian people who can pass for white can experience a  different kind of racism such as being bullied for not being “Asian enough” or “white enough”.

THE MODEL MINORITY MYTH

The “Model Minority Myth” credits the success of Asian people to a strong family structure and a better work ethic than other minorities. The myth highlights and draws a distinction between Asian people and those In the Black community, attributing many of the struggles Black people face to weak family structures and a worse work ethic than other minorities – an opposite Model Minority Myth both myths nonetheless.

Another pillar of this myth is that all Asian families are socioeconomically well-off. It discredits the experience of members of the Asian community that had or have financial difficulties, are refugees, or  are  anything  less than the upper class.

The myth erases the struggles of the Asian community and simultaneously promotes anti-Blackness.

Effects the Myth has had on the Asian Community

Overall, the myth has fueled tolerance for racism against Asians, particularly non-Eastern Asians. Because of the myth, there  has  been  a  divide between East Asians and Southeast, South, and Central Asians. Many non- East Asians feel that East Asians have had an easier time dealing with racism than they have. Similarly, some East Asians feel that the divide is unfairly created by non-East Asians.

How has the Myth Affected the Relationship of Asians to Other People of Color?

The divide has not only been felt internally to the Asian community but has also caused a separation between Asians and other people of color. The myth fans the flame of Anti-Blackness particularly in the United States. As a result, some Black people feel resentment towards Asians because they are pitted as opposites according to the myth.

So Why is it Still Happening?

Is it because there  is  truth  to  the myth? No. Evidence? None. Fairness? Not a chance. So, if there’s no truth, no evidence, and no fairness… why is anyone perpetuating this belief?

Mainly because it has been taught and passed down through generations and reinforced by stereotypes broadly put on display in media.

WHILE THE ATTACKS ON THE ASIAN COMMUNITY MIGHT NOT BE YOUR FAULT, THEY ARE YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.

Our Opportunity to Ignite Change, Not Fire, Is Now.

On January 28th, 2021 84-year-old Vicha Ratanapakdee was shoved to the ground while taking his morning walk in San Francisco.

Unfortunately, two days later, Mr. Ratanapakdee succumbed to his injuries from the assault in the hospital.  Since  January  of  this  year, there have been over 20 reported violent attacks and robberies where the victims were Asian. This month eight women, six of them of Asian descent, were senselessly murdered by 21-year-old Robert Long  in Atlanta, Georgia. Not only is this attack an act of white supremacy, but also of male supremacy and it needs to stop. The Asian community is not to blame for the COVID-19 pandemic. The violence against the Asian community has been perpetrated due to fake news,  false  accusations, and unfounded and baseless information. Sadly, as we’ve seen before in history, some people feel the need for a scapegoat  and  that  unfair burden has most recently fallen on the Asian community.

So, reader, what are you going to do about it? While the attacks on the Asian community might not be your fault, they are your responsibility. It is the responsibility of everyone to band together and help stop this violence. If you have social media, share the hashtag #STOPAAPIHATE. And if you or someone you know witnesses a hate crime against a member of the Asian community please report it to the NAPABA by emailing standagainsthate@napaba.org or by completing their hate crime intake form. The only way to fight this is together.

Sources / Research

Abdollah, Tami, and Trevor Hughes. “Hate Crimes against Asian Americans Are on the Rise. Here’s What Activists, Lawmakers and Police Are Doing to Stop the Violence.” USA Today, Gannett Satellite Information Network, 4 Mar. 2021, www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/02/27/asian-hate-crimes- attacks-fueled-covid-19-racism-threaten-asians/4566376001/.

Chow, Kat. “’Model Minority Myth Again Used As A Racial Wedge Between Asians And Blacks.” NPR, NPR, 19 Apr. 2017, www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2017/04/19/524571669/model-minority-myth- again-used-as-a-racial-wedge-between-asians-and-blacks.

Lang, Cady. “Asian American Attacks: What’s Behind the Rise in Violence?” Time, Time, 18 Feb. 2021, time.com/5938482/asian-american-attacks/.

Richard Fausset, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, and Marie Fazio. “8 Dead in Atlanta Spa Shootings, With Fears of Anti-Asian Bias.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 19 Mar. 2021, www.nytimes.com/live/2021/03/17/us/shooting-atlanta- acworth.

Tang, Terry. “Victims of Anti-Asian Attacks Reflect a Year into Pandemic.” PBS, Public Broadcasting Service, 2 Mar. 2021, www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/victims- of-anti-asian-attacks-reflect-a-year-into-pandemic.

Photos

All photos were sourced from the website pixabay.com and are free for commercial use with no attribution is required. For more details on the license please go here: https://pixabay.com/service/license/

Undoubtedly, you have heard someone say that  all  Asians  look the same or are  the  same.  While this is far from the  truth,  it continues to be shared  as  if  it  is. Not every Asian person is from the same culture. Even  the  ones  that are do not have the same lives and experiences. There are 48 countries in the continent of  Asia.  Forty- Eight. So no, not every Asian person you see is Chinese or Japanese.

Asian people can also identify with their region, country, or continent. For instance, someone who is Chinese can also identify as East Asian, and/or Asian. Every Chinese person is East Asian and Asian, but not every East Asian or every Asian is Chinese.

WHITE PASSING

White passing means that a person who is not white culturally  has  a skin tone fair  enough  or  has features that could allow them “pass” for a white person.  East Asians tend to be the closest to having white-passing traits. Why does this matter? This can affect those who cannot pass for white because they are more likely to experience racism. On the  other side, Asian people who can pass for white can experience a  different kind of racism such as being bullied for not being “Asian enough” or “white enough”.

THE MODEL MINORITY MYTH

The “Model Minority Myth” credits the success of Asian people to a strong family structure and a better work ethic than other minorities. The myth highlights and draws a distinction between Asian people and those In the Black community, attributing many of the struggles Black people face to weak family structures and a worse work ethic than other minorities – an opposite Model Minority Myth both myths nonetheless.

Another pillar of this myth is that all Asian families are socioeconomically well-off. It discredits the experience of members of the Asian community that had or have financial difficulties, are refugees, or  are  anything  less than the upper class.

The myth erases the struggles of the Asian community and simultaneously promotes anti-Blackness.

Effects the Myth has had on the Asian Community

Overall, the myth has fueled tolerance for racism against Asians, particularly non-Eastern Asians. Because of the myth, there  has  been  a  divide between East Asians and Southeast, South, and Central Asians. Many non- East Asians feel that East Asians have had an easier time dealing with racism than they have. Similarly, some East Asians feel that the divide is unfairly created by non-East Asians.

How has the Myth Affected the Relationship of Asians to Other People of Color?

The divide has not only been felt internally to the Asian community but has also caused a separation between Asians and other people of color. The myth fans the flame of Anti-Blackness particularly in the United States. As a result, some Black people feel resentment towards Asians because they are pitted as opposites according to the myth.

So Why is it Still Happening?

Is it because there  is  truth  to  the myth? No. Evidence? None. Fairness? Not a chance. So, if there’s no truth, no evidence, and no fairness… why is anyone perpetuating this belief?

Mainly because it has been taught and passed down through generations and reinforced by stereotypes broadly put on display in media.

WHILE THE ATTACKS ON THE ASIAN COMMUNITY MIGHT NOT BE YOUR FAULT, THEY ARE YOUR RESPONSIBILITY.

Our Opportunity to Ignite Change, Not Fire, Is Now.

On January 28th, 2021 84-year-old Vicha Ratanapakdee was shoved to the ground while taking his morning walk in San Francisco.

Unfortunately, two days later, Mr. Ratanapakdee succumbed to his injuries from the assault in the hospital.  Since  January  of  this  year, there have been over 20 reported violent attacks and robberies where the victims were Asian. This month eight women, six of them of Asian descent, were senselessly murdered by 21-year-old Robert Long  in Atlanta, Georgia. Not only is this attack an act of white supremacy, but also of male supremacy and it needs to stop. The Asian community is not to blame for the COVID-19 pandemic. The violence against the Asian community has been perpetrated due to fake news,  false  accusations, and unfounded and baseless information. Sadly, as we’ve seen before in history, some people feel the need for a scapegoat  and  that  unfair burden has most recently fallen on the Asian community.

So, reader, what are you going to do about it? While the attacks on the Asian community might not be your fault, they are your responsibility. It is the responsibility of everyone to band together and help stop this violence. If you have social media, share the hashtag #STOPAAPIHATE. And if you or someone you know witnesses a hate crime against a member of the Asian community please report it to the NAPABA by emailing standagainsthate@napaba.org or by completing their hate crime intake form. The only way to fight this is together.

Sources / Research

Abdollah, Tami, and Trevor Hughes. “Hate Crimes against Asian Americans Are on the Rise. Here’s What Activists, Lawmakers and Police Are Doing to Stop the Violence.” USA Today, Gannett Satellite Information Network, 4 Mar. 2021, www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/02/27/asian-hate-crimes- attacks-fueled-covid-19-racism-threaten-asians/4566376001/.

Chow, Kat. “’Model Minority Myth Again Used As A Racial Wedge Between Asians And Blacks.” NPR, NPR, 19 Apr. 2017, www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2017/04/19/524571669/model-minority-myth- again-used-as-a-racial-wedge-between-asians-and-blacks.

Lang, Cady. “Asian American Attacks: What’s Behind the Rise in Violence?” Time, Time, 18 Feb. 2021, time.com/5938482/asian-american-attacks/.

Richard Fausset, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, and Marie Fazio. “8 Dead in Atlanta Spa Shootings, With Fears of Anti-Asian Bias.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 19 Mar. 2021, www.nytimes.com/live/2021/03/17/us/shooting-atlanta- acworth.

Tang, Terry. “Victims of Anti-Asian Attacks Reflect a Year into Pandemic.” PBS, Public Broadcasting Service, 2 Mar. 2021, www.pbs.org/newshour/nation/victims- of-anti-asian-attacks-reflect-a-year-into-pandemic.

Photos

All photos were sourced from the website pixabay.com and are free for commercial use with no attribution is required. For more details on the license please go here: https://pixabay.com/service/license/